roaches

Asian Cockroaches In Charlotte

Asian cockroaches are becoming more of a pest control problem in the Charlotte, North Carolina area. There are a couple reasons for the recent establishment of these roaches in Charlotte. Here’s what you need to know:

Asian Cockroach

Asian Cockroaches In Charlotte, NC

 

First discovered in Florida in late 1968, heavily infested areas have now been discovered in Charlotte and surrounding areas in North Carolina. It’s not only North Carolina that is venerable to these roach pests, as much of the south-eastern United States is housing these imported cockroaches.

Many Charlotte residents don’t know that they have Asian cockroaches because they are commonly confused with the German cockroach; another common Charlotte pest control problem. Even though Asian cockroaches look conspicuously similar, German cockroaches are darker in color than the Asian cockroach. The Asian Cockroaches’ wings are also narrower and longer.

Because invasions of 30,000 to 250,000 Asian cockroaches (per acre) are common, large areas around infested Charlotte homes will (likely) require aggressive pest control services; to effectively eliminate the problem. Furthermore, if the area surrounding the property remains untreated, it could result in an Asian cockroach re-infestation.

Asian roaches enter Charlotte homes through gaps in doorways and windows. They’ll directly fly to your walls while avoiding baseboards and other typical German cockroach harborages.

To learn more about the Asian cockroach, click here.

Charlotte Pest Control For Asian Cockroaches

 

Out of all the different species of cockroaches, the Asian cockroach just might be the most difficult to control. One of the reasons these roaches are so difficult to control, is because they can fly. In fact, Asian cockroaches have been known to fly well over 120 feet. This means, that even if you treat the roaches on your Charlotte property, new roaches can fly in from areas that haven’t been treated with pesticides. Re-infestations can be common unless other preventative measures, like eliminating water and food sources, are taken.

The Asian cockroach is vulnerable to all pesticides, but some are more effective than others. Stay away from residual sprays. Residual sprays around the perimeter of structures are usually ineffective because there are numerous infested areas in lawns, mulch, and wooded areas. Instead, opt for toxic baits. Toxic baits applied to infested areas outdoors have provided the most reliable control. Cockroach baits have been registered for use outdoors.

Charlotte Roach Control

 

No matter the type of cockroaches infesting your home, a roach control professional can help exterminate them.

Bulwark Exterminating
1801 North Tryon Street
Charlotte, NC 28206
(704) 321-3716
bulwarkpestcontrol.com
 
A-1 Wildlife Control
Wilgrove-Minthill Road
Charlotte, NC 28227
(704) 334-1922
a1wildlifecontrol.net
 
Orkin Pest & Termite Control
100 Reagan Drive #3
Charlotte, NC 28212
(866) 713-9979
orkin.com
 

How I Keep My House Cockroach-Free

I am not scared of roaches. However, I do hate the bugs. They make my skin crawl just by being what they are. What I hate the most are flying cockroaches. You just never know where they’ll land. In case they land on your arm or face, their tiny feet will feel repulsive on your flesh. Also, I’ve seen grown men scream like little girls when such things occur. I admit that I do find these events quite hilarious.

The apartment where we lived before had plenty of roaches. We couldn’t do much because the units were right next to each other and not everyone liked to keep their places clean. So, even though we made sure that our spot was garbage-free, our neighbors weren’t as careful. Thankfully, we moved to our own house. We’ve been here a year and we do see occasional roaches outdoors. But our house has stayed roach-free. Here are some of my regular practices that I feel have kept these bugs outside my home.

1. Clean with Vinegar

My mother taught me that pests do not like the smell of vinegar. She always cleaned kitchen surfaces, gas stove tops, and tables with a water and vinegar solution. To make, just blend equal amounts of water and white vinegar in a container or a spray bottle. Just apply or spray and then wipe.

Aside from vinegar, many people also recommend the use of certain essential oils as the scents are said to deter roaches. Rosemary and citrusy oils are popular alternatives. For me, I place dried bay leaves in dark corners, especially those where I think roaches might hide. I crush the leaves first to further release the odor. Some people also say that catnip is a great roach deterrent.

2. Sprinkle Diatomaceous Earth

One of my neighbors has a roach problem. She doesn’t know where they hide, but she sees a few during the day. At night, however, once the lights are out, so many of these bugs come out of hiding. Every time she turns on the light to drink water or do something, she sees the critters quickly scuttling to dark corners. I’ve advised her to contact a pest professional because it seems that her problem is already pretty extensive. Also, because I am afraid that the roaches might think about moving in my home too, I have began to sprinkle DE around my house, especially near the garbage bin.

DE is a fine powder that is non-toxic and Earth-friendly. It sticks on the outer skin of roaches and other pests that have exoskeleton, like ants and spiders. Then, the substance slowly scrapes the outer layer, creating injuries that make an insect dehydrated, which then leads to death. I have to use a mask during application because the dust is so fine that I can readily inhale it, which isn’t good because the minute particles stick to the lungs.

3. Keep House and Yard Clutter-Free

Cleanliness is really the best way to avoid getting a roach infestation. Don’t leave food lying around, and don’t throw garbage carelessly. Clean up dead leaves and wood, and keep your rooms free of clutter. Make it a point to vacuum at least twice a week, and always clean up after spills.

Citations:

Claire Trent, the author, wants to share her experiences about pest control so that people will learn about how some creatures can affect quality of life and health. Read more about common household pests here.

Avoid Eating Roaches And Leave Them To The Exterminators

Roach Eating Contest

A 32 year old south Florida man died last week after a roach eating contest in order to win an ivory ball python at a local reptile store. Edward “Eddie” Archbold is seen in the above video grabbing handfuls of roaches, and throwing them in his mouth like popcorn. Witnesses say Eddie dominated the contest, in which he won, by almost inhaling the roaches. It appears in the video as if he wasn’t even chewing the roaches, just popping them in his mouth and swallowing them whole. An estimated 300 bystanders cheered him on as he covered his mouth, trying to keep the roaches down.

Shortly after winning the contest, Eddie began to feel ill. He began vomiting and eventually passed out. He was taken to a local hospital where he was pronounced dead. The medical examiner’s office is conducting tests to determine a cause of death, according to the sheriff’s office statement.

The reptile store’s roach eating contest was all part of a “Midnight Madness” promotion in which contest participants had four minutes to eat as many roaches as they could stomach.

A fellow roach eating contestant of Eddies, Mathew Karwacki, made the following Facebook comment about the roaches:

“Yes the contest was crazy, but all the bugs were captive bred and raised on a commercial diet and veggies. These insects are raised for the pet industry as fodder. So there was nothing that those bugs contained that would hurt a human (unless yes there was some sort of allergic reaction, but that is usually instant…he died awhile AFTER the contest)”

Entomophagy—The Act of Eating Insects

Eating insects might seem like a disguising act, better left for ‘Bizarre Foods’ host Andrew Zimmern. The truth is Entomophagy, or the act of eating insects, is a way of life for millions of people worldwide. People in less developed countries rely on insects for protein and other nutrients needed for survival. Many types of insects appear on menus, remaining a traditional food in many cultures throughout Latin America, Asia, and Africa.

Roach Control

Most of us in North Carolina find roaches revolting, and would no way ever consider putting on in our mouths. The truth is cockroaches are known for spreading diseases by transporting microbes on their bodies. Some of the diseases they can spread include: polio, typhoid fever, leprosy, and bubonic plaque. They have also been shown to cause allergic reactions in humans, which is the likely cause of Eddie’s death.

Cockroaches are definitely something you do not want in your home. If you are seeing roaches in your home, contact a local exterminator today!

Bulwark Exterminating
1801 North Tryon Street
Charlotte, NC 28206
(704) 321-3716
bulwarkpestcontrol.com

A-1 Wildlife Control
Wilgrove-Minthill Road
Charlotte, NC 28227
(704) 334-1922
a1wildlifecontrol.net

A-A Wildlife Damage Control
301 Bradford Drive
Charlotte, NC 28208
(704) 608-6950
aawildlife.com

 

Search and Rescue Cockroaches

First Response Cockroaches

 

Scientists at NC State University in Raleigh, North Carolina are putting cockroaches to good use for a change. They’re planning on their system of electronically equipped roaches saving lives during disasters like earthquakes, fires and chemical attacks. Cockroaches are suiting up with miniature backpacks that have microchip sensors, and they are then steered around by using low frequency electrical pulses that the insects pick up with their antenna. The equipped roaches work kind of like a wireless remote control cars mounted with cameras and microphones. As long as you continue feeding the roaches electrical impulses, they will keep going.

Once these cockroaches are outfitted, they will be able to make their way through the fallen ruble and debris. The roaches will look to locate trapped victims with their mounted cameras, and use their microphones to pick up cries for help. This will enable responders in locating trapped victims and send help quickly. Researchers at the University believe that their efforts will make a big difference, especially after disasters in heavily inhabited metropolitan areas.

The research team is outfitting the Madagascar hissing cockroach, one of the world’s biggest species of roach. They can grow up to three inches long, but are still small enough to make their way through the fallen debris. Click here to read more.

What Else Can Roaches Do?

 

It’s fascinating to read about all the remarkable things the insect world can do for us, including cockroaches. For each story of insects helping humanity, there are millions more negative stories. Roaches pose a severe health risk. They leave behind feces and saliva that have the potential of spreading 33 different types of bacteria. Cockroaches also have specific proteins that have can cause severe allergic and asthmatic reactions. Additionally, cockroaches are hosts to six different parasitic worms and quite a few human pathogens.

If you are living in Charlotte, NC area, and have a cockroach problem inside your home, contact a local exterminator immediately. Don’t put your health in jeopardy. Let’s let the researchers at NC State University find better uses for the cockroaches.

Bulwark Exterminating
1801 North Tryon Street
Charlotte, NC 28206
(704) 321-3716
bulwarkpestcontrol.com

A-1 Wildlife Control
Wilgrove-Minthill Road
Charlotte, NC 28227
(704) 334-1922
a1wildlifecontrol.net

A-A Wildlife Damage Control
301 Bradford Drive
Charlotte, NC 28208
(704) 608-6950
aawildlife.com

Orkin
5100 Reagan Drive
Charlotte, NC 28206
(704) 694-6655
orkin.com

Roaches Eat Toothpaste!

What Else Do Roaches Eat?

Let’s start with the bad news. Roaches aren’t finicky eaters.  They eat about anything including: human hair, fingernail clippings, paper, clothing, cigarettes, wood, feces, soap, and yes even toothpaste. Food or crumbs that have been left out are easy meals for roaches. They especially love to chew on the glue found in wood paneling and on the back of wallpaper. If a roach is hungry enough, they’ll even eat each other. They are classified as omnivores, meaning they eat any type of organic food source they find.

Roach Prevention

Now the good news, roaches can be prevented. A roach’s favorite place to dine is the kitchen. Take precautions by not leaving food out, wiping down sinks and counters, storing food in air-tight plastic containers, using garbage cans with tight lids, and frequently cleaning. Eliminating leaking faucets and sealing of entry points to your house is also very helpful.

For additional help in eliminating roaches in your house, call a pest control professional today!

Bulwark Exterminating
1801 North Tryon Street
Charlotte, NC 28206
(704) 321-3716
bulwarkpestcontrol.com

A-1 Wildlife Control
Wilgrove-Minthill Road
Charlotte, NC 28227
(704) 334-1922
a1wildlifecontrol.net

A-A Wildlife Damage Control
301 Bradford Drive
Charlotte, NC 28208
(704) 608-6950
aawildlife.com

Orkin
5100 Reagan Drive
Charlotte, NC 28206
(704) 694-6655
orkin.com

Give your Valentine a Roach Name?

Happy Valentine’s Day!

Of all the crazy Valentine’s gifts and posts out there, How can a pest control guy compete? Well I was happy to resign this holiday to the flower puff girls and the chocolate Dips. Especially after our last bust on the 12 worst Christmas Gifts… Definitely leave me out of the Valentine’s scene.

Until I came across this Valentine’s Love Bug Gift idea…

Valentine's Day Roach

http://www.bronxzoo.com/name-a-roach/


NAME a Roach

Whaaaaat????? You can’t be serious. …but yes they are.

How low can you go?  You realize these are HISSING roaches?  Nothing says I love you more than a little hiss, especially when coming from a cockroach.

How can I sit here and be silent when the Bronx Zoo is making a mockery of Valentine’s Day for me? Sure sure, there’s a donation and it goes to a good cause. But wow?  WOW!  And I thought that dumping my girlfriend prior to Valentine’s day was low… I am sure many a women would prefer to be dumped over this Valentine’s day gift.

In all honesty, Who wants a roach named after them?

On Valentine’s day or any other day of the year? If you want to save this species or learn more about them then go buy one online. Yes, you can buy one online, an for a cheaper price then naming one.

But sticking with this them, without being a hater on Valentine’s day, our top ten picks for Roach Names:

10: Stinky

9: Bill

8: Dopey (as in smoke that roach)

7: Cat Bait

6: Poor boy’s pet.

5: I look like a prune but don’t eat me.

4: Colgate (You are what you eat.)

3: Chicken Soup ( Ask Luke Fender )

2: Splat. ( pest control humor )

1: Vader. “Happy…. <hooohhhpaaaa > Valentine’s Day…

< hoohhpaaaa.. cough> my young padawan.

Teens may have discovered a new Roach!

New York teens working on a DNA science project in New York may have discovered a new breed of cockroaches. The roach investigated during a DNA barcoding survey may represent a new species or subspecies. With the DNA varying from the current DNA barcode by 4% it seems possible that this cockroach could be an undiscovered species. Most DNA’s only vary by 1% and a variance by 4% isn’t just a quantity of 3 steps, but more a variance in scale, like a 1 versus a 4 on the Rickert scale of earthquakes. Officials have yet to determine if this is the case and it may be impossible to actually make a clear conclusion based on one sampling.

Interestingly enough, pests in general have a huge number of un-categorized and therefore “undiscovered” species and subspecies. Arguments about ants, scorpions, and the likes are ever raging. To further complicate things, insects seem to evolve much quicker. So is it really a new cockroach or is this just the 2010 model of the 2005 german roach… and I must say… nice hood.

But as one New Yorker put it… “I am not surprised.”

It seems almost iconic for the dingy dirty filthy New York city to find yet something another new, progressive, hip-hopping, whacked, yet artistic, cesspool creature… AKA Jane Roach #5839

By the way, the roach will go unnamed until they can be certain from a roach specialist that it is indeed a new species.. or at least sub species.

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