Tag Archive: Roach

Roaches Revealed

Roach Sweet ToothCockroaches are some of the peskiest creepy crawlers out there. They’re sneaky, sly, and definitely super gross. We’re all ashamed to admit that these guys have found their way into our homes at one time or another. They’re most found of our beloved pantries and refrigerators. While we hate the things, the pest control business loves them. Roaches are some of the most exterminated bugs in the industry. However, in the 1990’s of sunny Florida, exterminators seemed to have run out of cards against these unwavering opponents. The roaches had a new trick up their sleeves; losing their sweet tooth.

In the 1990’s exterminators were baffled by the critter. Exterminators used a poison mixed with sugary juices as bait that was sure to catch the cockroaches, but when the roaches weren’t biting, it seemed the epic battle against these nasty bugs would never end. However, in recent years, researchers Ayako Wada-Katsumata, Jules Silverman, and Coby Schal from nearby North Carolina University decided to investigate the invincible cockroach.

The Investigation Yields Results

 

Instead of taste buds, cockroaches have taste hairs all over their bodies. In order to determine why roaches have lost their love of sweets, researchers focused on the hairs around the roach’s mouth along with two types of nerves cells. These two types of nerve cells are responsible for transmitting to the roach the taste of sweetness and bitterness. When the sweet signal is sent the bug goes in for the kill, but when the bitterness signal is sent the bug scowls away. What the researches discovered in the common German cockroach was that glucose, which is a common component in sugary sweets, sparked the bitterness receptor. This newly evolved trait in the roaches is the reason they’ve been able to outsmart the pest control industry.

Roach SoupReactions

 

This discovery stirred up quite a reaction in the scientific community. Walter S. Leal, the head of the entomology department in the college of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences at the University of California, Davis and entomologist at Purdue University, Grzegorz Buczkowski, who were not involved in the study, were quick to remark on the findings in North Carolina.

“We lose baits all the time,” said Buczkowski. He also commented on how new poisons are constantly being developed to in order to maintain the effectiveness of the pest control industry. Bugs become resistant to the poison, just like bacteria become resistant to antibiotics.

Thanks to the research and its discovery, the market better understand how the roaches are surviving. It isn’t that their poisons are ineffective; it’s just that the bugs are changing their genetics and laying off the glucose. The cockroaches then pass off this trait and evolve into the monster roach that never seems to die.

“Sometimes the science is beautiful but you don’t know whether there is going to be an application fie years from now, 10 years from now or 100 years,” said Walter S. Leal.

So these results are definitely a breakthrough for the pest control market, and a great contributor in the mankind vs. roach battle.

 

Author Bio:  is a journalism student and blogger for Bulwark Exterminating, an industry leader in providing high quality roach control services. When I’m not playing with my two adorable nieces, I’m on the tennis court chasing that little green ball around.

Asian Cockroaches In Charlotte

Asian cockroaches are becoming more of a pest control problem in the Charlotte, North Carolina area. There are a couple reasons for the recent establishment of these roaches in Charlotte. Here’s what you need to know:

Asian Cockroach

Asian Cockroaches In Charlotte, NC

 

First discovered in Florida in late 1968, heavily infested areas have now been discovered in Charlotte and surrounding areas in North Carolina. It’s not only North Carolina that is venerable to these roach pests, as much of the south-eastern United States is housing these imported cockroaches.

Many Charlotte residents don’t know that they have Asian cockroaches because they are commonly confused with the German cockroach; another common Charlotte pest control problem. Even though Asian cockroaches look conspicuously similar, German cockroaches are darker in color than the Asian cockroach. The Asian Cockroaches’ wings are also narrower and longer.

Because invasions of 30,000 to 250,000 Asian cockroaches (per acre) are common, large areas around infested Charlotte homes will (likely) require aggressive pest control services; to effectively eliminate the problem. Furthermore, if the area surrounding the property remains untreated, it could result in an Asian cockroach re-infestation.

Asian roaches enter Charlotte homes through gaps in doorways and windows. They’ll directly fly to your walls while avoiding baseboards and other typical German cockroach harborages.

To learn more about the Asian cockroach, click here.

Charlotte Pest Control For Asian Cockroaches

 

Out of all the different species of cockroaches, the Asian cockroach just might be the most difficult to control. One of the reasons these roaches are so difficult to control, is because they can fly. In fact, Asian cockroaches have been known to fly well over 120 feet. This means, that even if you treat the roaches on your Charlotte property, new roaches can fly in from areas that haven’t been treated with pesticides. Re-infestations can be common unless other preventative measures, like eliminating water and food sources, are taken.

The Asian cockroach is vulnerable to all pesticides, but some are more effective than others. Stay away from residual sprays. Residual sprays around the perimeter of structures are usually ineffective because there are numerous infested areas in lawns, mulch, and wooded areas. Instead, opt for toxic baits. Toxic baits applied to infested areas outdoors have provided the most reliable control. Cockroach baits have been registered for use outdoors.

Charlotte Roach Control

 

No matter the type of cockroaches infesting your home, a roach control professional can help exterminate them.

Bulwark Exterminating
1801 North Tryon Street
Charlotte, NC 28206
(704) 321-3716
bulwarkpestcontrol.com
 
A-1 Wildlife Control
Wilgrove-Minthill Road
Charlotte, NC 28227
(704) 334-1922
a1wildlifecontrol.net
 
Orkin Pest & Termite Control
100 Reagan Drive #3
Charlotte, NC 28212
(866) 713-9979
orkin.com
 

10 Cheap Ways To Pest Proof Your Home

Beautiful HomeNo matter how much effort you put into protecting your home from pests, there are some insects that will find their way into your house. But even if that is the case, it can be made a lot harder for them to get in. By investing time in a little home maintenance tasks, you can make your home virtually pest free.

The 10 Cheapest Ways To Pest Proof Your Home

  • Keep screens on all your doors and windows

Screen doors should be installed in your home. If they are damaged or torn, get rid of them! In order to prevent the most minute or smallest of insects from entering your home, use the finest mesh screening you can find.

  • Seal around all doors and repair any openings

Bugs can get in if light or air can. Tight fitting floor sweeps should be installed at the exterior door bottom area. Fill the gaps with door seals at the top and sides of each door. Gaps and cracks in the basement, especially near pipes that enter or exit through the wall. Check outside around the house for other outlets, utility meters and vents that could be inviting for insects. Doors and windows general have some type of weather stripping.

  • Take time to seal cracks in the foundation of your home or the exterior walls

This can also include any fascia boards too. Exterior wall cracks welcomes insects in. A caulking solution on these cracks will greatly reduce insect visitors.

  • Check utility lines and other vents near appliances

If there are gaps or openings in and around the appliances in your home, they provide ways for insects to come in from the outside. Using a foam spray, cover these areas and keep the critters out!

  • Crawling CockroachSecure Attic with critter proof mesh

There are an abundance of critters and pests that would like to make themselves right at home in crawl spaces in your attic. Barriers should be installed to keep them out. By putting in some critter proof mesh on vents and crawl spaces, these critters will stay out and also keep the other fleas and mites that they carry out of your home as well!

  • Fix any leaks

This is because moisture can attract insects. Humidity of some amount is required for insects to live. Plumbing leaks should be repaired as soon as possible. Pipes that are dripping should be tightened and sealed. Heavy rain or flooding could greatly damage your basement is a proper drainage system is not installed.

  • Keep a clean and tidy kitchen

The kitchen is where food is stores and also where pests like to be right at home. So, most importantly keep the kitchen as clean as possible. Most pests it turns out are attracted to crumbs and bits of food left around. Some tips to keep the kitchen include keeping leftovers sealed up, double check counters for spills, clean containers of leftover residue, keep checks on spoiled fruit and produce, sweep up and vacuum regularly and try to wipe off and clean containers before recycling them. Most importantly, seal your food up tight!

  • Clean up the yard & clean up after pets

It’s true that the heaps of compost and decayed or dried up leaves are congregational points for insects. Keep a clean yard, as well as trim back bushes and tree limbs touching your home. Clean up any pet waste and keep your trash bins clean.

  • Get rid of unnecessary clutter

By keeping your house cluttered up, insects can find places to hide. Put your things away after they are used and keep your floor clear.

  • Take the garbage out

If it can be smelled, it’s time to remove it. These smells attract unwanted pests. Empty the garbage can as much as possible.

About the author: Chris is a blogger for a union pest control company.

How I Keep My House Cockroach-Free

I am not scared of roaches. However, I do hate the bugs. They make my skin crawl just by being what they are. What I hate the most are flying cockroaches. You just never know where they’ll land. In case they land on your arm or face, their tiny feet will feel repulsive on your flesh. Also, I’ve seen grown men scream like little girls when such things occur. I admit that I do find these events quite hilarious.

The apartment where we lived before had plenty of roaches. We couldn’t do much because the units were right next to each other and not everyone liked to keep their places clean. So, even though we made sure that our spot was garbage-free, our neighbors weren’t as careful. Thankfully, we moved to our own house. We’ve been here a year and we do see occasional roaches outdoors. But our house has stayed roach-free. Here are some of my regular practices that I feel have kept these bugs outside my home.

1. Clean with Vinegar

My mother taught me that pests do not like the smell of vinegar. She always cleaned kitchen surfaces, gas stove tops, and tables with a water and vinegar solution. To make, just blend equal amounts of water and white vinegar in a container or a spray bottle. Just apply or spray and then wipe.

Aside from vinegar, many people also recommend the use of certain essential oils as the scents are said to deter roaches. Rosemary and citrusy oils are popular alternatives. For me, I place dried bay leaves in dark corners, especially those where I think roaches might hide. I crush the leaves first to further release the odor. Some people also say that catnip is a great roach deterrent.

2. Sprinkle Diatomaceous Earth

One of my neighbors has a roach problem. She doesn’t know where they hide, but she sees a few during the day. At night, however, once the lights are out, so many of these bugs come out of hiding. Every time she turns on the light to drink water or do something, she sees the critters quickly scuttling to dark corners. I’ve advised her to contact a pest professional because it seems that her problem is already pretty extensive. Also, because I am afraid that the roaches might think about moving in my home too, I have began to sprinkle DE around my house, especially near the garbage bin.

DE is a fine powder that is non-toxic and Earth-friendly. It sticks on the outer skin of roaches and other pests that have exoskeleton, like ants and spiders. Then, the substance slowly scrapes the outer layer, creating injuries that make an insect dehydrated, which then leads to death. I have to use a mask during application because the dust is so fine that I can readily inhale it, which isn’t good because the minute particles stick to the lungs.

3. Keep House and Yard Clutter-Free

Cleanliness is really the best way to avoid getting a roach infestation. Don’t leave food lying around, and don’t throw garbage carelessly. Clean up dead leaves and wood, and keep your rooms free of clutter. Make it a point to vacuum at least twice a week, and always clean up after spills.

Citations:

Claire Trent, the author, wants to share her experiences about pest control so that people will learn about how some creatures can affect quality of life and health. Read more about common household pests here.

Happy Valentine’s Day To Charlotte. From Bulwark.

Everyone here at Bulwark would like to give Charlotte and its surrounding cities a giant Valentine’s Day hug. Everybody deserves to have a valentine this year. At Bulwark, we thought we’d surprise some unsuspecting, but very deserving people to show our appreciation.

Last week we sent out an order of flowers and chocolates to three of our favorite news casters on television: Natalie Pasquarella from TV 9, Dianne Gallagher from NBC Charlotte and Kelli Bartik from FOX Charlotte – all lovely and professional young ladies. Without being too creepy-viewer, we thought flowers and chocolate was the best and safest item to send. Every girls like flowers, right?

Kelli even posted a picture of her flowers on her twitter page. We appreciate the shout-out, Kelli.

Last week we also released our newest video. We created it specially for Valentine’s Day and sent a link to all three ladies for them to view. Take a look.

We certainly don’t want to let you all make the same mistake, so here is a small checklist of things to do before Thursday.

– Schedule Babysitter
– Make dinner reservations or buy homemade meal ingredients
– Buy a semi-expensive bottle of wine
– And chocolates
– Call Bulwark Exterminating (This one is REALLY important, we can’t stress it enough.)

Only in a college town
Here’s a funny story for you. When I was in my last year of college, my girlfriend (now wife), was in school with me as well. I had a night class on Valentine’s Day and the teacher promised she would let us out early. After getting out of class 15 minutes late, and I without any plans, started to drive around town looking for a place to eat. I picked her up, and we headed over to Outback Steakhouse (Gimme a break! I was in college!). Wait time? FOUR hours! “That’ll be like, midnight?” I asked the girl. “Yeah, about”, she responded. We grabbed some pizza on the way home, popped in a movie at home, then called it a night. We both had class early the next morning.

Tips On How To Prevent Pests From Invading Your Garden

Garden overlooking spectacular English countryside

Garden Pests

There is nothing quite as disgustingly irritating as seeing pests of any shapes or sizes scurry across your beautifully pruned lawn. Whilst rodents, insects, moles, squirrels and other pests can invade your garden at any time of the year, there are certain steps we can take to make life harder for a pesky pest in its quest to wreak havoc in our beloved gardens.

Take a look at some of the ways you can help prevent pests from invading your garden.

Keep Rubbish At Bay

There is nothing that rodents, such as rats and pests such as cockroaches, love more than rummaging round for decaying rubbish that has been left outside in the garden. The smell of food, whatever it may be, will attract rodents and pests, which will rapidly multiply in numbers unless the rubbish is dealt with accordingly and taken away.

This potential problem is easy to rectify or avoid by simply ensuring that all rubbish left outside your home is securely inside a sealed container that is impossible for any unwanted pests to enter.

Cover Up Compost

Similar to the irresistible odor of rotting food in unsealed bins floating into the air, the smells generated from unsealed compost heaps will inevitably attract pests and rodents. To avoid the likes of rats, mice, foxes and cockroaches congregating in your compost heap, take the sensible precaution of covering all compost up with a tightly sealed cover.

Trim Back Branches and Trees

Many insects live in the boughs and branches of trees and bushes and whilst this is not usually a problem if these insects are confined to our gardens, if they manage to make their way into our homes, it may become problematic.

You can limit the chances of tree-born insects making their way indoors by trimming back trees and bushes so that they are well away from the house, as overhanging branches that are in contact with the walls of houses is an open invitation for bugs galore.

Place Bird Feed in a Suitable Bird Feeder

Throwing the crusts of the children’s sandwiches and other unwanted food onto the lawn to feed the birds is just crying out to invite the likes of rats, foxes and pests into your garden. Instead of throwing food into the garden willy-nilly, place bird feed in a controlled feeder will ensure that only the birds reap your generosity and not every fox, squirrel, rat and mouse in the neighborhood!

Jessica Jones works as a pest controller and often uses supplies from turfland.co.uk to keep her garden pest free.

Warning: Bugs Hiding Inside Your Christmas Tree

Christmas tree

Christmas tree (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Warning: Bugs Hiding Inside Your Christmas Tree

It’s a tradition many of us look forward to every year. We round up the family and head to a Christmas tree lot or farm; or we head to the woods to chop down a beautiful Evergreen or Spruce. Great care is taken in selecting the perfect tree. It can’t be too tall, and its branches have to be sufficiently filled in. When selecting the perfect Christmas tree there is one thing on need to watch for; before bringing that wonderful smelling Christmas tree inside your home. It is Christmas tree bugs!

Christmas Tree Bugs

According to NBC, Christmas tree bugs may be an unforeseen present waiting for you underneath your tree this Holiday, and this present could potentially be a nightmare.

The usual tree bug culprits are aphids, bark beetles, gypsy moths, bagworms, weevils, and spider mites. If you bring them inside your home, they could hatch and multiply causing a full on pest infestation. They will get in your carpet, your bedding, and in your couch.

Many of these insects are considered harmless. Harmless or not, you probably don’t want to spend the holiday season with bugs crawling around among you and your presents.

Common Christmas Tree Bugs

 

Aphids– Are small sap sucking insects the flourish on plant hosts like Christmas trees. They may be green, black, brown, pink or almost colorless. They are very tiny, and have antennae, with long, thin legs. Approximately two-hundred and fifty species of aphids are known to create serious pest control problems.

Spider Mites– Can cause pest control concerns when their minute exoskeletons and feces become airborne and inhaled. This can trigger an allergic reaction in some people, and can cause several forms of allergic diseases; including hay fever, asthma and eczema.

Gypsy Moth—Range in color from white, gray, or tan. They eat the leaves of over 300 species of trees, and are one of the most destructive pests of hardwood trees in the Eastern United States.

Bark Beetles—If bark beetles have infested your Christmas tree, they will leave winding tracks that are visible throughout the trunk. Bark beetles are known to reproduce in the inner bark.

Tips On Selecting A Pest-Free Christmas Tree

Scolytinae beetle damage under bark from Nager...

  • Get you’re trees from a reliable source, someone who has their gypsy moth permit.
  • Look for trees that have a certificate.
  • Ask if the tree has been sprayed for insects.
  • Look for aphids, gypsy moths, spider mites, and their egg sacks near the top and trunk of the tree.
  • Look for small holes with sawdust trails (pictured right), which are a sign of bark beetles.
  • Shake your Christmas tree vigorously before bringing it inside your home. This can dislodge spiders and other unwanted hitchhikers.

Charlotte Pest Control

If you happened to bring any unwanted pest hitchhikers inside your home with your Christmas tree, seek the help of a licensed Charlotte exterminator. Whether you are dealing with Christmas tree bugs, unwanted roaches, or house spiders; a Charlotte pest control professional can help ensure you have a pest-free holiday.

Pest Control In Charlotte, NC

 

Bulwark Exterminating
1801 North Tryon Street
Charlotte, NC 28206
(704) 321-3716
bulwarkpestcontrol.com

A-1 Wildlife Control
Wilgrove-Minthill Road
Charlotte, NC 28227
(704) 334-1922
a1wildlifecontrol.net

A-A Wildlife Damage Control
301 Bradford Drive
Charlotte, NC 28208
(704) 608-6950
aawildlife.com

Orkin
5100 Reagan Drive
Charlotte, NC 28206
(704) 694-6655
orkin.com

 

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Avoid Eating Roaches And Leave Them To The Exterminators

Roach Eating Contest

A 32 year old south Florida man died last week after a roach eating contest in order to win an ivory ball python at a local reptile store. Edward “Eddie” Archbold is seen in the above video grabbing handfuls of roaches, and throwing them in his mouth like popcorn. Witnesses say Eddie dominated the contest, in which he won, by almost inhaling the roaches. It appears in the video as if he wasn’t even chewing the roaches, just popping them in his mouth and swallowing them whole. An estimated 300 bystanders cheered him on as he covered his mouth, trying to keep the roaches down.

Shortly after winning the contest, Eddie began to feel ill. He began vomiting and eventually passed out. He was taken to a local hospital where he was pronounced dead. The medical examiner’s office is conducting tests to determine a cause of death, according to the sheriff’s office statement.

The reptile store’s roach eating contest was all part of a “Midnight Madness” promotion in which contest participants had four minutes to eat as many roaches as they could stomach.

A fellow roach eating contestant of Eddies, Mathew Karwacki, made the following Facebook comment about the roaches:

“Yes the contest was crazy, but all the bugs were captive bred and raised on a commercial diet and veggies. These insects are raised for the pet industry as fodder. So there was nothing that those bugs contained that would hurt a human (unless yes there was some sort of allergic reaction, but that is usually instant…he died awhile AFTER the contest)”

Entomophagy—The Act of Eating Insects

Eating insects might seem like a disguising act, better left for ‘Bizarre Foods’ host Andrew Zimmern. The truth is Entomophagy, or the act of eating insects, is a way of life for millions of people worldwide. People in less developed countries rely on insects for protein and other nutrients needed for survival. Many types of insects appear on menus, remaining a traditional food in many cultures throughout Latin America, Asia, and Africa.

Roach Control

Most of us in North Carolina find roaches revolting, and would no way ever consider putting on in our mouths. The truth is cockroaches are known for spreading diseases by transporting microbes on their bodies. Some of the diseases they can spread include: polio, typhoid fever, leprosy, and bubonic plaque. They have also been shown to cause allergic reactions in humans, which is the likely cause of Eddie’s death.

Cockroaches are definitely something you do not want in your home. If you are seeing roaches in your home, contact a local exterminator today!

Bulwark Exterminating
1801 North Tryon Street
Charlotte, NC 28206
(704) 321-3716
bulwarkpestcontrol.com

A-1 Wildlife Control
Wilgrove-Minthill Road
Charlotte, NC 28227
(704) 334-1922
a1wildlifecontrol.net

A-A Wildlife Damage Control
301 Bradford Drive
Charlotte, NC 28208
(704) 608-6950
aawildlife.com

 

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